Knitting has a long history. The British isles have a strong tradition as well as Scandinavia. I use patterns from both. I have a wonderful book with old patterns from Gotland and another one from Cornwall. I found this book in “The museum of fishing and smuggling” in the little fishing village Polperro.  In Cornwall the fishermen wore homemade “Guernsey frocks” (sweaters) and the villages had patterns of their own. During the 19th century village women produced large quantities of knitwear for sale which provided extra income to the family. Shetland isles have the most elaborate and colourful patterns in Britain. Alice Starmore lives in Scotland and has collected patterns from Scotland, Scandinavia and many other countries. She has published many books and has a web shop with books and yarns. It is highly recommended!

 

A collection of knitted garments:

 

 

 

To the left a sweater with patterns from different villages in Cornwall. The colour is not typical for Cornwall knitted garments traditionally, they are usually white, dark blue or grey.  But I like green. To the right a knitted costume I made for my daughter. The pattern is from Looe in Cornwall the design is taken from other garments she likes. All knitted in baby merino yarn, a wonderfully soft yarn.


 

 

 

Alpaca is a super soft and super warm yarn from the alpaca animal in South America. It is very suitable for scarves, hats and mittens. It is so warm it can be to hot for sweaters, even in Scandinavia’s cold climate.

More mittens:

 

 

 

Mittens with patterns from Gotland

 

 

 

Two pairs of mittens with details from Alice Starmore’s treasure of knitting patterns.